Safety

First Aid for Eye Injuries

State Fund

First Aid for Eye Injuries

 

The chance or severity of an eye injury can be reduced when workers recognize possible eye hazards, are trained to correctly use and care for eye protection equipment, and if they know what first aid to administer in the event of
an eye injury.

Warning signs should be posted near any work area, machine, equipment or process area that requires industrial-quality eye protection. To assure optimum eye protection, the appropriate protective equipment should be selected – safety glasses, goggles, face shield,
or helmet – and must meet Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) requirements. Personal prescription eyeglasses should only be worn in conjunction with OSHA/ANSI-approved eye protection equipment.

Below are basic first aid instructions for common eye injuries.

Foreign Particles such as dust, dirt, metal or wood chips, and even an eyelash can cause eye abrasion and damage.

Lift upper eyelid outward and down over the lower lid to remove the particle or let tears wash the particle out. If neither action removes the particle, keep the eye bandaged loosely to stop eye movement then seek professional medical treatment.

Do Not Rub The Eye

 

Chemical Contact from solvents, paints, hot liquids, or other hazardous solutions can cause serious eye pain and damage.

Go immediately to the nearest emergency shower or water source. Hold the eye open as wide as possible with fingers and look directly into the stream of water. If a contact lens is in the eye, begin flushing over the lens immediately.

This may wash away the lens. Flush the eye continuously and gently for at least 15 minutes then seek professional medical treatment.

Do Not Bandage The Eye. Do Not Use An Eye Cup.

Cuts and Punctures to the Eye or Eyelid

 

Cover the eye with a rigid shield without applying pressure to stop eye movement (the bottom half of a paper cup can be used), then seek professional medical treatment.

Do Not Wash The Eye With Water Or Other Liquid.

Do Not Rub/Press/Remove The Embedded Object.

 

Bumps and Blows can result in eye pain and swelling. Apply a cold compress for at least 15 minutes without putting pressure on the eye. Crushed ice in a plastic bag can be taped to the forehead to rest gently on the injured eye. If experiencing continued pain, reduced vision, or discoloration (black eye) which could indicate internal eye damage, seek professional medical treatment.

Light Burns from exposure to welding, laser, or other radiant light may not be felt until hours later when the eyes begin to feel gritty or become red, swollen, and sensitive to light. Keep eyes closed and seek professional medical treatment.

Nothing can replace the loss of sight. Workers can protect their eyes and preserve their eyesight by wearing and caring for appropriate, approved protective eyewear and following proper first aid procedures when an eye injury occurs.

© 2013 State Compensation Insurance Fund

Established in 1914 by the state legislature, State Fund is California’s largest provider of workers’ compensation insurance and a vital asset to California businesses. Completely self supporting, State Fund plays a stabilizing role in California’s economy by maintaining an open door policy that ensures all employers have a strong and stable option for their workers’ compensation needs.

Push or Pull?

State Fund

Pushing and pulling are common activities in many work environments. At your job, you may be required to push and pull large and small items, levers, cables, boxes, carts, and more. When moving any load, use carts, dollies, mechanical or gravity fed rollers, mechanized carts, vacuum lifts, or powered equipment. Keep in mind that pushing or pulling these devices can strain your back, shoulders, and arms if not handled properly. Minimize the likelihood of an injury by evaluating the load, and by practicing safe ergonomics. Consider the following suggestions when you are required to push or pull a heavy object.

Before You Move the Load

Keep the following factors in mind prior to moving a load:

  • Weight of the load.
  • Height where the force is applied (location of handles or conveyor height).
  • Direction of the force applied (straight on or at an angle).
  • Slope and condition of the surface.
  • Condition of the item to be moved.
  • Posture when pulling the load (bending forward or twisting).
  • The need for additional help.
  • Grip of the worker’s shoes on the floor surface.
  • Surfaces should be clean and free of debris to reduce physical barriers to movement.
  • The route of movement should be evaluated and cleared of obstructions to minimize the exertion necessary to stop and re-start movement of the load.
  • Assess the stability of the load, and what means are necessary to stabilize the load.
  • Evaluate the potential use of leverage in moving the load through such measures as the use of pry bars; or exerting force at an angle, and ‘walking’ the load.
  • Anticipate the movement of the load should it break free, and anticipate your reaction to get clear of it. You may not have time to think…only react.
  • Position yourself to minimize injury in the event that the load does break free.

Make sure that you are not exceeding the recommended force for pushing your cart or hand truck.

Use devices that reduce friction between the object being moved and the surface area. For example, mount appropriate casters on carts and movable furniture to assure smooth unbroken surfaces on counters and shelves. Utilize slip sheets for moving patients and sliders for moving heavy items on carpet.

Use a vehicle or conveyor that can accommodate the size and weight of the load you are moving. Ensure that the design and type of conveyance is well maintained and appropriate for the item to be moved.

The Importance of Ergonomics

When pushing or pulling heavy objects, make sure to use good body mechanics:

  • Tighten your stomach muscles.
  • Bend your knees.
  • Lean in slightly toward the object you are pushing.
  • Lean slightly away from the object when pulling.
  • Keep your back and wrists straight.
  • Use your legs and weight of your body to move the object.

When possible apply force from approximately elbow height. Add handle extensions or provide vertical handles. Verify that conveyor heights are correct. Install platforms in workstations or redesign workplaces so that vertical pulls are not above shoulder height or below knee height.

In general, push rather than pull. Pushing a load is generally less stressful on your body because you use the weight of your body and maintain a more neutral posture. When you pull, your body is often twisted and you frequently use only one hand, increasing the possibility of injury. The stability of the load is increased, and stress on the upper body and likelihood of injury is reduced when the load is pulled while using some devices, such as hand trucks.

Keeping a mindset of safety is essential before pushing or pulling a load. You can reduce the chances of injury by ensuring that you assess the load prior to moving, using assisted devices properly, and following safe ergonomic practices.

© 2013 State Compensation Insurance Fund

Established in 1914 by the state legislature, State Fund is California’s largest provider of workers’ compensation insurance and a vital asset to California businesses. Completely self supporting, State Fund plays a stabilizing role in California’s economy by maintaining an open door policy that ensures all employers have a strong and stable option for their workers’ compensation needs.

Learn more about our Retailer Program

Learn More

Learn more about our Supplier Program

Learn More

Join the NMA

Membership in the NMA is an investment in the future strength of your business. There are so many reasons to join the NMA.

Who should join?

Our membership base includes retailers who own supermarkets, liquor stores, chain stores, drug stores, specialty markets, convenience stores, service stations and auto repair facilities. Equally active in the NMA are the wide range of brokers, distributors, suppliers and manufacturers. Additionally, service companies such as insurance, banking, media, electronics, refrigeration, security, etc. also make up the membership of the NMA. The NMA is truly representative of the food, beverage and petroleum industry.

Government Relations

The NMA represents your best interests at state government and in Washington by making sure that our legislators understand the industry’s issues. Your participation in the NMA brings you together with others in our industry so that we can combine forces to provide a unified voice on the issues that affect us as retailers.

Member Benefits

As a member of the NMA you have access to a network of endorsed services that enable you to improve your business as well as your profits.

Networking Opportunities

The NMA also offers a number of networking opportunities at the Annual Trade Dinner, Trade Shows, Scholarship Luncheon, Golf Outings, and other events to provide you the opportunity to build and foster key contacts in the industry.

If you are interested in more information on membership in the NMA just complete the form below and we will contact you with additional information.

Learn more about our Vendor Program

Learn More

Learn more about our Supplier Program

Learn More